Frank Programme on Sexuality

Sex and sexual health for people with disabilities are the focus of a new programme and podcast on OAR FM Dunedin.

To Be Frank is presented by educator and consultant Claire Ryan, who has worked in the disability sector for over 30 years, with more than 10 years’ experience in delivering training and workshops on sexuality.

Ms Ryan’s consultancy, also known as To Be Frank, was established in 2007. Over the years, she has worked with several disability agencies within the New Zealand Disability Support Network, as well as New Zealand schools and government agencies.

For people with disabilities, sex and sex education remains a taboo subject, she says.

“In my earlier work with service providers it was glaringly obvious that the people I got to work with, mainly who had intellectual impairment, weren’t having much intimacy in their lives.

“A conference on sexual abuse I attended in Auckland which was good but it made me think about the fact that within agencies we spent a lot of time creating policies on what people shouldn’t do, trying to protect disabled people from being sexual, and there wasn’t anything about what you can do and how you get started. It was all very risk averse, and I’m working to change that.”

Conversations around supporting people with disabilities should include talking about their sexuality, and services providers should not be surprised at clients wanting to form sexual relationships and express their sexuality.

“It’s still pretty disheartening that it comes as a big shock (to some service providers). It’s called inappropriate behaviour, and all the language around sexuality changes when referring to disabled people.

“Not everything is called a friendship. People do get to have relationships, and they have the right to get it wrong.”

A new episode of To Be Frank airs every second Thursday at 8.30pm, and is replayed at the same time on alternate Thursdays on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from oar.org.nz, Google podcasts and Apple podcasts.

Mornings More OARsome

New timeslot: Jeff Harford hosts the OARsome Morning Show on OAR FM Dunedin.

Weekday mornings just got more OARsome at OAR FM Dunedin.

The community access station’s OARsome Morning Show now starts at 8am with a 90-minute format, shifting from its former hour-long 9am slot.

Station manager Lesley Paris said the move reflected OAR FM’s commitment to its Dunedin audience.

“With an earlier start, the show is now reaching listeners on the morning commute and doing the school run, as well as those at home and work.

“It’s good news for community-minded people who are interested in hearing about the people and events that make Dunedin such a vibrant place to live.”

OARsome Morning Show host and OAR FM Community Liaison Jeff Harford, who has fronted the magazine-style show for the past eight years, said he was enjoying the new format.

“With a ninety minute show, we can present the right balance of information and entertainment to keep Dunedin in touch with what’s happening in the city at a grassroots level. The mix of regular features, interviews and music is a great way to start the day. ”

Regular features include a Monday digest presented by Disability Information Service, a Tuesday morning round-up from Dunedin community boards, a fortnightly Wednesday spot with Dunedin UNESCO City of Literature, a Thursday chat with The Star chief reporter Brenda Harwood, and Friday morning’s Volunteering Otago Hotspot.

The Southern District Health Board and Otago Museum also provided guest interviews monthly.

Harford wants to hear from listeners about things to be shared with OAR FM’s local audience.

“If you’ve got a fundraiser, an open day, a public meeting or an exhibition coming up, let us know about it and we’ll tell Dunedin, on air and via our online Dunedin Community Noticeboard.”

The OARsome Morning Show airs weekdays from 8am to 9.30am on 105.4FM and 1575AM, with feature interview podcasts available from oar.org.nz, Google podcasts and Apple podcasts. Contact jeff@oar.org.nz.

Radio Series On University 150th

This year, University of Otago celebrates its 150th anniversary, bringing together students, staff, alumni and the wider Dunedin community for a busy programme of events.

On OAR Dunedin’s new programme Daring to be Wise, educators, administrators and those whose time at Otago made a lasting impression share their inspirational stories, creating a collection of interviews that will serve as both a snapshot of university life in 2019 and a record of the institution’s history to date.

The interviews are hosted by OAR FM Community Liaison Jeff Harford, host of the OARsome Morning Show, with a new episode airing for each week of the anniversary year.

Episodes to date have included conversations with 150th Celebrations Project Co-ordinator Kerry Buchan, University of Otago Chancellor Dr Royden Somerville QC, and Dunedin mayor Dave Cull.

Ms Buchan said there was “something for everyone” in the programme of anniversary events.

“The university really wishes to engage with the community, alumni, existing staff and students, so we’ve based the year’s celebrations on a strong academic programme, a strong sporting and cultural flavour, a spiritual component and celebration of our Maori and Pacific divisions.”

Daring To Be Wise airs on Tuesdays at noon, with replays on Wednesdays at 5pm and Sundays at 8.30pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM, with podcasts available from oar.org.nz, Google podcasts and Apple podcasts.

Photo: Something for everyone: University of Otago 150th Celebrations Project Co-ordinator Kerry Buchan is one of the guests on OAR FM programme Daring To Be Wise.

Indigenous Perspective on Arts


Photo: Indigenous perspectives: (from left) Vicki Lenihan, Irene Karongo Hundleby and Lou Kewene-Doig hosts Natives Be Woke on OAR FM Dunedin.

Three Dunedin women are exploring the connections between creativity, technology and the indigenous world in a multi-platform programme that taps into their collective interests in music and the arts.

Natives Be Woke: Taihoa E Hoa is the brainchild of artist, producer and educator Lou Kewene-Doig, sculptor, writer and arts advisor Vicki Lenihan and ethnomusicologist, storyteller and arts advocate Dr Irene Karongo Hundleby.

The programme is broadcast and podcast from OAR FM Dunedin, and via vlog (video blog) from YouTube.

The show’s hosts believed the perspectives of Maori and Pacific Island women were missing from mainstream coverage of the arts. Stimulated by their own regular conversations on the topic, they successfully sought funding support from Ministry for Culture and Heritage’s Suffrage 125 initiative to create a mechanism for wider discussion.

Ms Kewene-Doig said it was important to make the show accessible, hence the decision to use video and audio platforms.

“We’re interested in unique views of what is happening in the world,” she said.

“Between us, we have the technical expertise to not only talk about these things but to show what we’re talking about, in as many cool ways as we can.”

Ms Hundleby said contributions from the programme’s audience were welcomed.

“The vlog enables us to get a response back from people. We really encourage people to engage with us and tell us their stories, to help build this discussion further.

“Culturally, multiple views within the collective is what we try to reproduce in another way, using technology.”

The next edition of Natives Be Woke: Taihoa E Hoa airs on Saturday 8 December at 2pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM, with podcasts available from oar.org.nz, Google podcasts and Apple podcasts.

A Voice for South Asian Women

The voice of South Asian women should be stronger in contemporary discussions of feminism, says a local broadcaster.

Swaroopa Unni hosts fortnightly programme HerStory on OAR FM Dunedin. The show features profiles of Indian and South Asian women who have made a contribution to the women’s movement.

“The feminist discourse is mostly from the Western perspective,” said Ms Unni.

“The voices of women from South Asia have to come forward. We’re always on the fringes and we need more visibility.”

HerStory was an opportunity to celebrate the achievements of “everyday women, artists, performers, and women from mythology or legend”.

“It could be my mother, grandmother, auntie or friend. These women are sometimes not recognised for the effort they have put in.”

Ms Unni is founder and choreographer of Dunedin’s Natyaloka School of Indian Dance. Her ‘liberal” upbringing instilled a confidence to voice her opinions and make decisions about career and family that not all South Asian women enjoyed.

“Some women are entrapped in patriarchal ideas of how and what a woman should be. Most of the time these definitions do not take into account what a woman wants.

“I’ve seen the struggles that my friends and family members have gone through, so compared to that I’m definitely more privileged. There are women who can’t do as they wish, but that doesn’t mean they are not talented and are not part of the women’s movement.”

The radio show had so far included profiles of Indian freedom fighter Savitribai Phule, Indian-born American astronaut Kalpana Chawla and Carnatic singer, cultural activist and scholar Bangalore Nagarathnamma.

Podcasts could be downloaded and shared from oar.org.nz.

HerStory airs fortnightly on Mondays at 7.30pm.

LISTEN TO PODCASTS

Photo: Recognising women: Swaroopa Unni hosts HerStory on OAR FM Dunedin.

Never Ending Journey Into Rock

A journey into the history of rock and roll that began on radio six and a-half years ago shows no sign of nearing an end.

Dunedin man Warren Voight hosts 360 Degrees ’Round Wazrock on OAR FM Dunedin, an hour-long exploration of a music genre he has dedicated a lifetime to, along with a fair amount of spare change.

With a personal collection of albums and singles, 78s, CDs, books and other ephemera that numbers around 5000 items, and a “wants list” that never seems to shorten, Mr Voight is not short of material for his radio show and podcast. It is made to be shared, he says, because “music is part of who we all are”.

From bouncing on his father’s knee to the sounds of Rock Around The Clock by Bill Haley and His Comets to purchasing his first long player 26 Solid Gold Rock ‘n’ Roll Hits as a teen, Mr Voight’s earliest musical experiences remain sharp in his memory. Teenage years spent listening to glam rock and heavy rock peaked a curiosity in the roots of these more flashy forms of the genre.

“It all started with Appalachian mountain music, the seedbed of what we know as modern music, along with the Jewish music hall tradition and other early forms.”

First going to air in September 2011, Wazrock had explored those country music influences before traversing blues, bluegrass, swing, the big-band era and the jive scene. It was then on to early rhythm and blues, rockabilly and the English beat groups.

“I’ve predominantly focused on that side of the Atlantic, so far. Now the show is heading into glam rock, which had a big part to play in reviving the fun side of music. It was getting a bit dirgy there in the seventies, with prog rock and the rest of it.”

The show would then “double back”, with future episodes exploring the American beat groups and bands of the 1970s. New Zealand and Australian acts would also feature, as there was “a couple of years’ worth in that”.

“I’ll look into all the main artists, because they’re always important, but I also want to touch back on the lesser artists that often get overlooked. It’s never ending, really.”

360 Degrees ’Round Wazrock airs on Saturdays at 3pm on OAR FM Dunedin 105.4FM and 1575AM.

Podcasts are Available Here

Photo: Shared collection: Warren Voight hosts 360 Degrees ’Round Wazrock on OAR FM Dunedin.

Podcasts Explore Wild Dunedin

A series of podcasts exploring our relationship with local wildlife is complementing the Wild Dunedin Festival that launches in Dunedin tomorrow.

Wild Dunedin Podcasts are the brainchild of Otago Museum science communicator Claire Concannon and University of Otago conservation biologist Jamie McAulay. The episodes air on OAR FM Dunedin and can be downloaded from the station’s website and several other podcast platforms.

Mr McAulay said the pair were “blown away” by last year’s Wild Dunedin festival and decided to seek the festival’s support to create an audio resource for this year’s events.

“We’re both big fans of well-produced podcasts where you can tell a story quite carefully, in a narrative kind of way. So we have a pretty open approach to how we do that, using sound effects, voice and music.”

University researchers and local wildlife experts had contributed to conversations over the six-episode series and had assisted with sourcing soundbites, such as bird and animal calls. Dunedin-based musician and educator Molly Devine had composed instrumental pieces for use as an ethereal backdrop to stories of the natural world.

Ms Concannon said there was a wealth of relevant knowledge that could be tapped into to promote interest in the flora and fauna of Dunedin. The podcast series and the Wild Dunedin festival were designed to encourage locals to better appreciate the “huge diversity at our doorstep”.

“The idea is to get the local community to fully embrace this incredible wildlife that’s around us, and also to understand what the wildlife needs from us so that we can share this space.”

Topics for Wild Dunedin Podcasts included migratory journeys, the work of Predator Free Dunedin, the prospect of southern right whales returning to Otago Harbour, sea lions of the Otago Peninsula, and the endemic plants and other “little things” often ignored.

Gecko smuggling would also get a mention, said Mr McAulay.

“We tell a story of why people are wanting to put these geckos in their undies and fly around the world with them.”

Wild Dunedin Podcasts air on Tuesdays at 3pm and Sundays at 6pm on OAR FM Dunedin 105.4FM and 1575AM.

Podcasts are available HERE

Photo: Wild stories: Claire Concannon and Jamie McAulay host Wild Dunedin Podcasts on OAR FM Dunedin.

Town Belt Plays Part in Thriller Podcast

Thriller: Local writer Emily Duncan has placed the Town Belt at the heart of three-part podcast Dark Dunedin: Heaven Looks On.

Dunedin’s Town Belt plays a special role in a three-part thriller podcast penned by local writer Emily Duncan.

Dark Dunedin: Heaven Looks On was presented as part of this year’s Dunedin Fringe Festival programme by Prospect Park Productions, formed in 2016 by Ms Duncan and Wellington-based producer H-J Kilkelly. The series was recorded and edited at OAR FM Dunedin and received its premier broadcast on 11 March.

It is now available as a podcast to be downloaded and shared.

Ms Duncan said the Town Belt provided the setting for the drama, which has a violent crime and “nostalgic and gothic Dunedin” at its heart.

“The podcast is set around quite a small geographical area where this crime takes place and where the protagonist, Louise Hepburn, resides. She lives alone and regularly walks the area at night.

“We begin not really knowing what her connection is, apart from being in the proximity. As the story unravels we see she is somewhat closer to it.”

Listeners could discover – or re-discover – historic, natural, and supernatural features of Dunedin including “the whoosh of Lamson pipes at Penroses Department Store, twinkling stars in the St James theatre, and Kēhua, sprites, and demons dancing under the moonlight in the Town Belt.”

Creating a podcast was a departure from writing for theatre, where once a production had been staged it was gone. A podcast could “live forever” on the Internet and be listened to at any time, in any location.

“We also have some fantastic talent and resources in Dunedin, so I saw a podcast as a way we could beam Dunedin talent to the world.”

The cast was headed by Julie Edwards, who played the part of Louise Hepburn, and included Dougal Stevenson, Terry MacTavish, Cheryl Amos, Robert Shand and Phil Vaughan.

Original music had been composed and performed by Marama Grant.

Dark Dunedin: Heaven Looks On is available as a podcast from OAR FM Dunedin website www.oar.org.nz and from iTunes.

Music Geeks Share Misadventures

Geeking out: Viki Kingsley-Holmes (left) and Amanda Mills host Misadventures in Sound on OAR FM Dunedin.

Two self-professed music geeks are bringing their diverse musical tastes together for a Friday night radio show that entertains and informs.

Amanda Mills and Viki Kingsley-Holmes present OAR FM Dunedin show Misadventures in Sound, an hour-long exploration of the connections between artists and their influences.

Having bonded a couple of years ago over a mutual love of local music and the Beatles, the pair have been waiting for the opportunity to share their music collections and in-depth knowledge of favourite acts with a wider audience.

While they shared much common ground in terms of musical preferences, there were opportunities to explore the outer fringes of each other’s respective collections.

“It’s all about taking listeners on a journey with us,” said Ms Kingsley-Holmes.

“I might learn a little bit about Kate Bush from Amanda and she might learn a little about Muse from me.

“We’re not here to influence anybody, but it’s not a bad thing if we do.”

Ms Mills, curator of Music and AV at the Hocken Library and a music writer for theAudioculture and New Zealand Musician websites, said the show provided each host with plenty of “light-bulb” moments, where a great song or an interesting fact about the artist led to an appreciation of something new.

“It’s always good to expose yourself and others to new music because that’s the way you find things you thought you might not like or have never heard of before.

“We also discover connections, where one artist influences another. We find those stories and tease them out to see if we can find those influences in their music.”

Ms Kingsley-Holmes summed up the Misadventures in Sound ethos in a few pithy words.

“It’s for music geeks who like banter.”

Misadventures in Sound next airs fortnightly on Fridays at 8pm on OAR FM Dunedin 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from www.oar.org.nz.

Arts Show Debunks Myths

If you don’t know much about art but you know what you like,The Arty Farty Hour on Otago Access Radio might be just the show for you.

Programme hosts and local artists Ron Esplin and Andy Cook are keen to debunk commonly held myths around engaging with the art world, including that it is for experts only.

“We need to keep this art business user friendly,” said Mr Cook, owner-operator of Dunedin art supplies shop Art Zone.

“I know a lot of people are intimidated. They think that only professional artists are allowed to paint, and that’s not true. What we talk about on the show helps to ease people into it, especially if they are just starting out.”

The Arty Farty Hour blends profiles of leading artists with discussion on technique and materials, accompanied by music that is either art-themed or performed by recording artists who also dabble in other art forms.

Mr Esplin launched the show in 2013, keen to provide a voice for the Dunedin art community in local media. The on-air partnership with Mr Cook began some time later, when a one-off guest appearance fired an engaging on-air rapport built on shared discovery, laughter and plenty of good-natured ribbing.

“I admire Andy’s work and that’s a great catalyst for our discussion,” he said.

“I tend to focus on watercolour painting and Andy on oils. It’s a lifelong occupation and I originally thought that once I had the hang of it, I’d move on. I now know that you never do.”

Much of the programme was well researched but unscripted, said Mr Cook.

“We have this mutual interest in arts and one thing leads to another. For me, it’s just a really interesting conversation.

“I’d be here, even if the mics weren’t on.”

Fortnightly programme The Arty Farty Hour  airs Saturdays at 1pm on OAR FM Dunedin 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: Perfectly framed: Andy Cook (left) and Ron Esplin are hosts of The Arty Farty Hour on Otago Access Radio.