Election Coverage 2017

Child Poverty Election Candidate Forum

On Wednesday 23 August 2017 a General Election Candidates Forum on Child Poverty was held at Knox Church Community Hall, Dunedin.

The forum was organised by Connect South in partnership with Aotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workers, Public Health Association of New Zealand and the Child Poverty Action Group.

Candidates to address the forum were: Metiria Turei MP (Green), Clare Curran (Labour), Paul Foster-Bell (National), Warren Voight (NZ First) and Lindsay Smith (The Opportunities Party).

The forum is podcasts in its entirety.


Dunedin Youth Debate

In this special broadcast we bring you coverage of the Dunedin Youth Debate held on Thursday the 31st of August at Otago Boys’ High School, organised by the Dunedin Youth Council.

In this debate, representatives from four political parties discussed issues relevant to young people in Dunedin.

We will hear from; Shane Gallagher (Green), Paul Foster-Bell (National), Clare Curran (Labour) and Abe Gray (The Opportunities Party).

For more information on the Dunedin Youth Council, check out their Facebook Page


Election Forum: Climate Change and Environmental Issues

In this special event broadcast we bring you coverage of the ‘Election Forum on Climate Change and Environmental Issues’, held at the Otago Polytechnic on Wednesday the 6th of September.

This event was organised by Sustainable Dunedin City and Chaired by Jinty MacTavish.

We hear from six representatives as they discuss their parties policies on environmental issues

Niki Bould – Green Party
Miriam Mowatt – Democrats for Social Credit
Lindsay Smith – The Opportunities Party
David Clark – Labour Party
Warren Voight – New Zealand First
Lachie Ashton – Conservative Party


OARsome Morning Show – 08-09-2017
Elections 2017 – Dee Vickers, Registrar of Electors

Tech Explainers

A new show on Otago Access Radio is shedding light on the often murky world of technology.

Tech Explainers is presented by self-confessed “geeks” Dan Faulknor and Mike Beattie. A shared interest in all things technological led to the friends pairing up to create podcasts for Mr Faulknor’s Interesting Radio website.

Mr Faulknor said the Tech Explainers series arose from a comment on an online forum, asking why there was little support available for those who were unfamiliar with the language used around the technology that people use every day.

“As tech people, we have a habit of not explaining things in simple terms. So this was a bit of a challenge for us, to talk about technology in a way that regular people can understand.”

The radio show, which included some content that was not available on the podcast series, was something the whole community could benefit from, he said. Topics for the first few editions included the Internet, Wi-Fi and GPS, while password security would be covered when additional research was completed.

“We’re really looking to our listeners to determine what subject we should cover, so on each show we put a call out for people to get in touch with their questions.”

Mr Beattie said the show was for people with curious minds.

“You might know that your computer hooks up to something in the wall that gives you access to web pages, news sites, the weather and your email. But what gets this stuff to us?”

He pointed to smart fridges as an example of the “Internet of Things”, the interconnection via the Internet of computing devices embedded in everyday objects, enabling them to send and receive data. Grocery lists would be compiled and sent based on what items were detected as missing.

“That’s the future – more automation, delivery of things right to your door, things happening for you rather than you having to do it yourself.”

Tech Explainers airs every second Wednesday at 10am on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available fromwww.oar.org.nz. Questions can be emailed tofeedback@techexplainers.com.

Photo: Geek talk: Dan Faulknor (left) and Mike Beattie host Tech Explainers on Otago Access Radio.

Bluesology

Dunedin blues fan Tony Nielsen is not letting his “one big regret” get in the way of delivering a diverse programme of blues music on Otago Access Radio.

The host of Saturday afternoon show Bluesology decided to sell his 1000-strong collection of blues LPs back in the 1970s, to free up cash to support his growing family. Despite some niggling remorse over the move, he says it has made him all the wiser in rebuilding his collection.

“The good thing is I’ve now got the knowledge of which are the best LPs to get. Back in the sixties when I was first importing them, it was a bit of a blind guess.”

While Mr Nielsen’s blues collection was well short of its former impressive size, he was steadily augmenting a sizeable CD catalogue with new vinyl purchases.

“I prefer to play vinyl because it does offer a greater authenticity to the sound, but everyone will have that debate.”

Mr Nielsen developed an appreciation of the genre as a teenager growing up in New Plymouth, first enjoying the blues-influenced rock of British acts such as the Rolling Stones, Pretty Things and John Mayall. He then moved on to what he calls “the real thing”, the music of black American blues artists from the 1920s forward.

Bluesology was an opportunity to share a passion for blues in all its forms, he said.

“I’m trying to convey the breadth of blues music from the 1920s right through to today, because there are a number of younger artists who are true to the tradition although they have modernised it somewhat. I don’t have any hang-ups or boundaries.”

Mr Nielsen, who spent more than 40 years working in radio across New Zealand and in Australia, has special memories of some of his heroes in live performance.

“The very first blues concert I saw was Muddy Waters playing at the YMCA in Auckland around 1969. It was incredible. And Freddie King, Hound Dog Taylor and BB King were others who came to New Zealand. I was very lucky.”

Bluesology airs every Saturday at 4pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: The real thing: Tony Nielsen hosts Bluesology on Otago Access Radio.

Indigenous Encounters

A student of Indigenous Studies at the University of Otago is using her research as the basis of a new programme on Otago Access Radio’s Connecting Cultures Zone.

Pia Kahn hosts Indigenous Encounters every second Tuesday evening at 7pm.

“I feel that indigenous people should have a voice in the mainstream,” Ms Kahn said.

“A lot of people don’t even know what indigenous means, so the radio show is a great way to educate the public about it and to give a voice to marginalised people. Also, it’s a way for me to research as part of my studies.”

Ms Kahn has a particular interest in indigenous groups of the Philippines. In investigating her own Tagalog heritage, she has the documented the impacts of colonisation on Tagalog language and customs.

“There are certain remote areas in the Philippines where Tagalog is still spoken in a way you don’t hear any more. So I’m concerned about certain words being lost in our culture because the national language is based on Tagalog but has loaned words from other languages.”

Moves to restore the lost arts and crafts of other indigenous cultures would also be explored on the radio show. Ms Kahn pointed to an initiative in Guam to revive construction of canoes and sailing vessels once used by ancient Chamorro settlers as an example worthy of coverage.

Two recent episodes featured interviews with Infinite Dakot-ta, an international artist who combines spoken word, hip-hop, indigenous chants, body movement and dance to convey a message of love, liberation, and the revival of indigenous cultures and values.

“I think there are certain cultural features in common with indigenous people,” Ms Kahn said.

“They are usually very connected to the areas they’re in, and the world view is nature-based and quite spiritual. Most have had to resist colonisation and commercial encroachments on their lives.

“Indigenous Encounters will explore some of the contemporary responses to that.”

Indigenous Encounters airs every second Tuesday at 7pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available fromwww.oar.org.nz.

Photo: World view: Pia Kahn hosts Indigenous Encounters on Otago Access Radio.

Law Talks Put Listeners On Front Foot

A weekly Otago Access Radio segment is providing insight into how New Zealand law impacts on our everyday lives.

Speak Legal is a regular feature of Thursday’s OARsome Morning Show, with programme host Jeff Harford discussing a different legal topic each week with Community Law Otago volunteer law students.

Community Law Otago managing solicitor Caryl O’Connor said the radio spot was one of a range of legal education initiatives under way. Others included the programme of free talks that had been operating in Otago for the past 30 years, with the aim of providing practical and accessible information on everyday legal issues to the Otago community.

“Law Centres around New Zealand are all about access to justice. That means smoothing the pathways for people and giving them the platforms they need to move a legal issue forward.

“We endeavour to put people on the front foot rather than having to react to something that’s being done to them. If they can foresee something happening and work to put themselves in the best position possible, that’s got to be a good thing.”

The senior law students contributing to the Speak Legal series were free to explore an area of particular interest to them but the aim was to cover the issues that most commonly arose at Community Law Otago’s drop-in advice clinics.

Radio also provided an opportunity for students to test their presentation skills.

“They have to be succinct and accurate, and they have to make interesting,” Ms O’Connor said.

“That can sometimes be quite difficult with law, so they’ve got to be a bit creative with how they put their talks together.”

Community Law Otago had recently moved from its former Filluel St location to new premises at 169 Princes St. Information on clinics and resources could be found at www.communitylawotago.com.

Speak Legal airs Thursdays at 9.10am on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: Legally speaking: Senior law student Jared Papps (left) talks law with Jeff Harford on Otago Access Radio’s Speak Legal segment.

Back On Air with Fine Tunes

The love of new music has lured Dunedin man Alistair Addis back to the Otago Access Radio airwaves after a year-long break.

Alastair presents Fine Tune, a programme of World music, jazz, acoustic pop and rock, every Saturday evening. The former host of OAR FM’s An Aural Adventure has tweaked the formula, broadening the style of music covered and shifting to a two-hour format.

He said his time off from presenting a radio show had made him “lazy” in his search for new music.

“I really missed being on the radio, and I was finding that I wasn’t spending the time keeping up with fresh releases.

“I like to help as much as I can to get new music heard by other people.”

Alastair’s appreciation for World music had developed while he was living in Australia. Regular attendance at the WOMADelaide festival had opened his ears to the “amazing” production and “feel” of the work of many international artists.

A sunset performance by Tinariwen, the Grammy Award-winning group of Tuareg musicians from the Sahara Desert region of northern Mali, had been “sublime”, while Portuguese singer Maritza had dominated the stage with her take on traditional Fado music, he said.

A stint running a music store in Dunedin had been the fulfilment of a boyhood dream for Alistair and had furthered his interest in recordings by lesser-known artists. It had also kept him up to the play with developments on the Dunedin music scene, ensuring his radio shows included a sprinkling of local releases.

Listeners to Fine Tune could expect each edition to “start gently” and build steadily to a second hour that featured more rock-oriented or faster-paced tracks, he said.

Fine Tune airs Saturdays at 6pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: Keeping it fresh: Alistair Addis hosts music show Fine Tune on Otago Access Radio.

All Glammed Up For Friday Night Radio

Otago Access Radio’s Friday night line-up has a little added sparkle, courtesy of two committed music lovers.

Dr Glam and Demelza’s Inflammable Spandex Cafe is hosted by University of Otago music lecturer, performer and author Dr Ian Chapman, with partner in musical crime Demelza May. As the title suggests, the programme has fun and weirdness at heart.

Dr Chapman, who laid glitter-rock alter-ego Dr Glam to rest in 2014 only to resurrect him for last year’s Planet Earth Is Blue tribute to David Bowie at Sammy’s, said it felt right to lend the name to a radio show.

“Dr Glam is all about fun and this show is certainly that, so I thought I would align it to my most fun character. Thankfully, Demelza is on the same wavelength.”

Ms May agreed that the pair shared some common ground but said the show also contrasted their respective collections.

“Ian is all about the ‘70s. The time I was discovering going out and having lots of fun was the ‘80s, but I just like whatever can get me dancing and feeling good.”

On any given episode, listeners might expect to hear Dr Chapman introduce tracks from the likes of the Sweet, Slade, Bowie, Iggy Pop and the Ramones, while Ms May favoured Style Council, De La Soul, UK Squeeze, Talking Heads, Was (Not Was) and House of Pain.

A regular feature of the show was a “Local Gem” – a track by Dunedin-based musicians, some of whom were Dr Chapman’s students.

Dr Glam and Demelza’s Inflammable Spandex Cafe launches a diverse evening of music every Friday at 6pm. It is followed at 7pm by indie music show Blip In The System, at 8pm by The Vinyl Vault, at 9pm byThe Afro-Caribbean Show, and at 10pm by house and techno show The Strobe Room.

Dr Glam and Demelza’s Inflammable Spandex Cafe airs Friday at 6pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM, and live and podcast from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: On fire: Demelza May and Dr Ian Chapman present Dr Glam and Demelza’s Inflammable Spandex Cafe on Otago Access Radio.

All About the Bass in the Strobe Room

If you don’t know your Acid House from your Dub Techno but love electronic music regardless, Otago Access Radio’s Friday night programme The Strobe Room could be just the thing for you.

The show’s host James Mather would prefer listeners simply enjoy the opportunity to sample from his huge collection of tracks, without splitting hairs over the many sub-genres of dance music that would confound even the most dedicated of train-spotters.

An Austria-based listener recently took him to task in an email over whether the music on the show was strictly house and techno.

“This is where the Internet warriors kick off,” Mr Mather said.

“I don’t care whether someone considers it house or techno; to me it’s more the vibe of the electronic music with a regular bass beat, synth sounds and percussion.”

A former “metalhead”, Mr Mather became a convert to dance music in the early 1990’s after helping organise a warehouse rave in an industrial estate in Cornwall, England. Resistance to the then Criminal Justice Bill’s proposed crackdown on anti-social behaviour saw civil liberties groups join forces with sound systems, groups of DJs and engineers working together as one, to organise unregulated dance events.

“We didn’t feel that we were doing anything wrong. We were just getting together and dancing,” he explained. “I was blown away. The music was such a physical force, it went right through the chest.”

Relocating permanently to New Zealand in 2006, Mr Mather found there was little in the way of a club scene to nurture his interest. But by that stage he had already “dialled back” the late nights and had turned instead to collecting electronic music and listening to it at home, focusing on the work of emerging underground artists and bedroom DJs.

The Strobe Room was a means of sharing his growing tracklist with the rest of the world.

“This show is for anyone with an interest in electronic music, from the harder end to the more melancholic and subdued side. There’s really too much choice.”

The Strobe Room airs Friday at 10pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM. Podcasts are available from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: In the house: James Mather is the host of The Strobe Room on Otago Access Radio.

Disability and Health Show Plenty to Digest

Dunedin-based social service organisation Disability Information Service (DIS) is using radio as a means of reaching a wider audience for advice about disability and health related matters.

Short bulletin The Digest is a regular feature of the Monday edition of Otago Access Radio’s OARsome Morning Show. The spot will include notices from the many community organisations in the Otago health and disability sector that contribute information for distribution by DIS, via email and newsletter.

Newly appointed DIS executive officer Debbie Webster said the opportunity to talk about the many events, workshops, conferences and classes on offer was a way of making information more accessible.

“Not everybody can access online material or read the printed version of the many notices we get. Being able to also use radio is really valuable.”

The programme would provide DIS with a platform for discussing its wider role in the region. Not aligned with any particular provider of health and disability services, the organisation was able to provide free and impartial advice on the wide range of resources, community groups and “natural supports” that were available.

“We are kind of like the Citizens’ Advice Bureau to the health and disability community. We join the dots, break down barriers and connect people to the services and information that will help them through whatever they are facing.

“Questions can be as simple as where do I get a mobility parking sticker for my car to identifying what supports were available for a child with an intellectual disability who is leaving school, or how best to manage a chronic health condition that has become quite disabling.”

Helping people navigate systems and funding streams so that they might access the support they required was a key role for DIS, as was the sale or hire of living aides, wheelchairs and continence products from its office at Dunedin Community House.

“There’s certainly plenty for us to talk about. We’re excited to get started.”

The Digest airs on the OARsome Morning Show on Mondays at 9.10am on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM, and live and podcast from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: Informed: Disability Information Service manager Debbie Webster (left) and information consultant Emma Brockie present The Digest on Otago Access Radio.

 

Radio Explores the Power of Positive Action

Rape Crisis Dunedin is using radio as a way of highlighting the achievements of organisations and individuals working in the interests of women and families, around the world.

Fortnightly show The Empower Half Hour is hosted by Rape Crisis community educators Anna Hoek-Sims and Rachel Shaw.

Anna said the focus of the programme was “not just feminism”.

“We’re coming from an all-encompassing point of view, so it doesn’t matter what the gender is of any person we might talk about. We want to celebrate that there are some stars shining brightly out there in the world.”

Malala Yousafzai, a Pakistani activist for female education and the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate, was one such inspirational individual. Her memoir I Am Malala and 2015 documentary film He Named Me Malala had provided insight into how determined advocacy for change had grown into an international human rights movement.

Rachel cited the wave of women’s marches that followed the election of Donald Trump to the United States presidency as another source of motivation.

“The amount of work and passion that went into those marches was very inspiring to me.”

The radio show would include updates on events closer to home, music by women artists and thoughtful quotes to ponder. It would also build on workshops the pair were conducting with Dunedin secondary school students on issues of consent and bystander intervention, and explore the latest initiatives to address online bullying.

“Radio is a way of branching out to reach some of the community we wouldn’t meet through the training we do,” Anna said.

“It’s a way of saying there’s still some positive, amazing things going on in the world today at a time when there are a lot of conflicts. And it’s a great way for us to maintain a healthy working environment. We hear a lot of negative things as support workers and when we debrief with other staff. So for me it’s part of my self-care.”

The Empower Half Hour airs every second Tuesday at 12.30pm on OAR 105.4FM and 1575AM, and live and podcast from www.oar.org.nz.

Photo: Inspiring work: Rape Crisis Dunedin community educators Anna Hoek-Sims (left) and Rachel Shaw are hosts of Otago Access Radio show The Empower Half Hour.